Featured Tricone Inventory for October

We are pleased to announce the six featured items this month:

5 7/8" New Oil and Gas Tricone

 

5 7/8″ New Oil and Gas Tricone
available in IADC 517,537,617,627

 

 

 

6" New Oil and Gas Tricone

 

6″ New Oil and Gas Tricone
available in IADC 537,547,637
this diameter is also available in airblast IADC 612

 

 

6 1/4" New Oil and Gas Tricone

 

 

6 1/4″ New Oil and Gas Tricone
available in IADC 517,537

 

 

 

8 1/2" New Oil and Gas Tricone

 

 

8 1/2″ New Oil and Gas Tricone
available in IADC 114,115,126,134,214

 

 

9 7/8" New Oil and Gas Tricone

 

9 7/8″ New Oil and Gas Tricone
available in IADC 545
this diameter is also available in airblast IADC 622

 

 

 

11 5/8" New Oil and Gas Tricone

 

11 5/8″ New Oil and Gas Tricone
available in IADC 545,625

 

 

 

Please contact us for more information or to inquire after a certain item.

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To get on the list, click here!

The Tricone Geothermal Energy – The Heat is On

tricone-oil-drilling-rig-arrivingIf there was a popularity contest for drill bits, the tricone would win hands down. Geothermal energy, though not as well-known as the tricone, is an increasingly hot topic around the globe. To understand why, you need only look at its advantages, drawbacks and prospects for growth in the years to come.

For years, drilling and the tricone have been focused on the extraction of oil and natural gas. But with the steady depletion of these resources through tricone drilling, alternatives are needed.

What is it?

That’s where geothermal energy comes in. By drilling deep underground with the tricone, we can access a powerful heat source to turn water into steam, run it through a turbine and produce electricity. Once accessed through tricone drilling, geothermal energy provides power for a number of applications.

What’s so great about it?

Anyone who’s been involved with tricone drilling knows first-hand about the advantages of a tricone. In addition to its unparalleled quality, the tricone is durable, reliable and precise.

So why choose geothermal energy to access with the tricone?

1. Running Costs: Like the tricone, geothermal energy is cost effective, with running expenses approximately 80% less than for fossil fuels. Also, since it doesn’t involve fuel like other substances accessed by the tricone, geothermal energy entails a fairly small outlay for transportation, purchasing and plant clean up.

2. Pollution: Unlike some resources accessed with tricone drilling, geothermal energy is relatively friendly to the environment. While there is some pollution involved, it pales next to conventional targets of the tricone like coal and fossil fuels. As well, the carbon footprint generated by geothermal power plants is minimal compared to other tricone drilling projects.

3. Stability: As an alternative to traditional tricone drilled material, geothermal energy is more reliable than other options like solar or wind power that rely heavily on the weather. Consequently, geothermal power plants are ideally suited to meeting the base load energy requirements. They also benefit from a high capacity factor, in that their actual output of power closely matches the total installed capacity.

4. Renewability: Although our supplies of many energy staples extracted with the tricone are massive, they are also finite. This is a major reason that many countries are focusing more of their tricone efforts on geothermal energy. Not only is it renewable in that it’s a resource that is naturally replenished, but it sustains its own consumption rate where fossil fuels reached by tricone drilling do not.

What’s the catch?

While the tricone really has no downside, most things are not that fortunate, and geothermal energy is no exception:

1. Expensive Start up: Traditional tricone drilling projects vary widely in their budgets. It’s one reason that the tricone is the drill bit of choice for so many of them. Not only is the tricone available in different price ranges, but there are excellent used tricone bits available that are equally reliable. On the other hand, most commercial geothermal projects come with a high price tag. Deep drilling with the tricone is required, and the cost of drilling greatly increases with depth.

2. Lack of Widespread Use: Because geothermal energy has yet to be widely accepted, there is a shortage of skilled workers and suitable site locations. It’s a bit of a catch-22 situation, in that the low level of usage is in itself a hindrance to achieving greater acceptance.

Where do we go from here?

In spite of its challenges, geothermal energy is one of the few renewable energy sources that offers continuous baseload power. As such, it can be a key player in moving us towards cleaner, more sustainable energy.

As research reduces drilling costs and enhances plant efficiency, more countries are likely to explore this option. The next chapter has yet to be written, but one thing is for sure. The potential to improve the planet by tapping into its own heat power makes for a heartwarming story.

New Inventory

We’re pleased to announce the arrival of the following new inventory!

New items are added regularly, so please check back often.

3 3/4 NEW 211

3 7/8 NEW 211

3 7/8 NEW 531

4 3/4 NEW 211

4 7/8 NEW 211

6 1/8 NEW 211

5 7/8 NEW 517

5 7/8 NEW 537

6″ NEW 612

6 1/4 NEW 537

9 7/8 NEW 622

9 7/8 NEW 545

9 7/8 NEW 517

13 3/4 NEW 625

Please contact us for more information or to inquire after a certain item.

To stay in the loop, you can also sign up for our once-a-month email newsletter announcing our latest stock additions and specials.

To get on the list, click here!

March Sale

We’re pleased to announce our March Sale features the following item:

10 5/8 211 brand new for US$1000/each 

Please contact us for more information or to inquire after a certain item.

To stay in the loop, you can also sign up for our once-a-month email newsletter announcing our latest stock additions and specials.

To get on the list, click here!

March’s Featured Tricone: Sealed Bearing TCI

17 1/2 NEW SEALED BEARING TCI

WP_20140203_13_28_30_Pro

 

Please contact us for more information or to inquire after a certain item.

To stay in the loop, you can also sign up for our once-a-month email newsletter announcing our latest stock additions and specials.

To get on the list, click here!

Tricone Arctic Drilling: The Cold Facts

kbs-drill-bits-arctic-drillingWhen it comes to accessing new oil and gas supplies with tricone drilling, companies will sometimes get a chilly reception. But ironically, one of the coldest places on earth may be a hotbed of tricone activity in the years ahead.

While tricone drilling seems to offer infinite possibilities for securing vital resources, it cannot escape one simple truth: Resources – even those that are so efficiently gathered through tricone use – are finite. As a result, many oil and gas reserves around the world are declining significantly after decades of tricone drilling.

The Appeal

So it should come as no surprise that a number of countries are warming to the idea of tricone drilling in the Arctic. With 13 percent of the planet’s untapped oil deposits and 30 percent of natural gas reserves located above the Arctic Circle, it’s a tempting target for oil dependent nations and their future tricone projects.  Russia, Canada, the United States, Norway, Iceland and Denmark have all given their energy companies a not so subtle nudge to explore tricone drilling possibilities in the region.

The Pitfalls

If tricone drilling in the Arctic was easy, anyone could do it, and the countries targeting this area would be well on their way to extracting the treasure; but there are reasons that extensive tricone drilling hasn’t happened yet. In winter, much of the area is covered by sea ice and there is the constant threat of severe storms, making tricone work challenging at best and hazardous at the worst of times. Of course, should drilling activity one day proceed on a large scale, tricone bits will prove invaluable, as their durability and quality give them the best chance of withstanding the harsh northern conditions.

This is one instance where global warming could actually be beneficial. In summer and fall, it will often reduce the amount of sea ice and facilitate extensive tricone drilling. What’s the catch? The same phenomenon that minimizes sea ice may also lead to difficult weather conditions and other dangers, inhibiting that same tricone activity.

As is often the case, some of the most imposing obstacles to successful tricone efforts up north may come not from weather or geography, but from people. Fearing threats to wildlife and contamination of local waters, environmentalists and indigenous communities have filed lawsuits to prevent tricone drilling unless and until a satisfactory solution is found.

And in many ways, those who are pushing hardest for tricone projects in the Arctic may be their own worst enemies. A number of the boundary lines in the region have not yet been fully set or identified. As a result, several countries are laying claim to the area and the riches available through tricone drilling, going so far as to threaten military action should one of their rivals impinge on “their” territory.

Shell Shocked

A graphic illustration of the challenges inherent in Arctic tricone work is the experience of Shell, which has yet to drill a productive well with a tricone or anything else, in spite of spending billions of dollars on their efforts. Their experience has raised fears that a major spill following tricone drilling could be highly destructive, due in part to the ice floes and sea ice that might interfere with cleanup efforts.

Of course, nothing worth having comes easily, and the vast reserves of oil and gas that await tricone drilling in the Arctic are no exception. But it’s a tribute to the industry’s high regard for tricone bits that, if and when the puzzle of how to access the Arctic is solved, the tricone will surely be the centerpiece.

Find just what you need in a gallery of tricone bits.